Indian families are insane. Most people know this. Most people also know that a group of Indian people in close proximity sounds like a comedy show – that has been picked up by various broadcasting channels several times, over the past few decades. In fact, I often think most British Indian families have been playing an undercover gameshow since the 1970s. 

The game in question consists of a series of levels that you have to surpass until you unlock the grand prize. A bit like ‘Who wants to be a Millionaire’ but without all of the problematic connotations that come with actually making that connection. 

The twist is that the game show isn’t a test of general knowledge and instead, your success is determined by how stereotypically ‘Indian’ the problems you have are. Before you ask: yes, marriage is a reoccurring theme in every section. The producers might even have an ‘Indian trauma checklist’ to ensure they’ve covered all of their top priority social and economic talking points. 

rsnet

 

There are several reasons behind why I think we’ve been playing an undercover gameshow since the 1970s. Firstly, have you ever noticed the lack of diversity? I mean, according to the representation of Indian people in mainstream British media, we’ve been dealing with the same socioeconomic problems since the 1970s. 

 

The monotonous and repetitive portrayal of Indian people may have peaked at a questionable height because I’m beginning to wonder whether the producers of said broadcasting channels are trying to use their platform to create awareness towards contemporary issues, or if they’re just typecasting? 

 

rsallpeople 

From a capitalist perspective, drawing attention towards problematic yet innovative Indian people in the 21st century might be considered as quite the modern-day revelation. Especially as we live in a society that likes to clump POC under a niche, little umbrella filled with different types of prejudice and everyday discrimination.  

I’m all for drawing attention towards the Indian edition of ‘inevitable childhood drama’ you’ll endure whilst growing up; but why are all of our stories the same? Instead of creating a safe space for our voices to be heard, we’re just making noise. And taking pride in it.

rsapu

The irony is that we’re silenced by the idea that we’ve been given a voice, but when the voice is Apu from The Simpsons – you can take it back. How can we even take ownership of our narrative if the writing is monotonous and the one Indian character is voiced by a white man?

 

So, how do you deal with your overbearing Indian family?

 

I don’t know. It’s subjective.

 

I can tell you how I deal with mine though? 

SONGS:

  1. Dholida | LOVEYATRI

I mean, given the title of the post it kind of works! And also it’s almost festival season for a lot of Indian people and this song is the perfect garba and dhandiya song!

2.  Teeth | Five Seconds of Summer

They occasionally make decent music too.

3. Swim Home | Cautious Clay

This song is very lowkey and I really like it omg

2 thoughts on “How do you deal with your overbearing Indian family? 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s